Elizabeth Barker1,2,3,4

b. between 1591 and 1609, d. 24 March 1620/21
     Elizabeth Barker was born between 1591 and 1609 in England.3 She married Edward Winslow, son of Edward Winslow and Magdelene Ollyver, on 16 May 1618 in Leiden, South Holland, Holland.5,1,2,3,4 Elizabeth Barker died on 24 March 1620/21 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, now Plymouth County, Massachusetts.1,2,3,4
     She and Edward Winslow immigrated on the Mayflower, departing from Plymouth, England September 6, 1620, arriving 11 November 1620 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, now Plymouth County, Massachusetts.6,3,7,4

Citations

  1. [S21] John H. Sheppard, "Genealogy of the Winslow Family."
  2. [S48] The Great Migration.
  3. [S11] Mayflower History, online www.mayflowerhistory.com.
  4. [S1164] Ruth C. McGuyre and Robert S. Wakefield, MF 5 WInslow.
  5. [S26] Mayflower Passengers.
  6. [S715] English-America, online www.english-america.com.
  7. [S1140] Merideth B. Colkert, Founders of Early American Families.
Last Edited=30 Jun 2015

Edward Winslow1,2

b. 17 October 1560, d. 1620
     Edward Winslow was born on 17 October 1560 in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England.1 He was the son of Kenelm Winslow and Elizabeth Foliott.3 Edward Winslow married as his first wife Eleanor Pelham, daughter of Herbert Pelham and Catherine Thatcher, before 1585.4 Edward Winslow married as his second wife Magdelene Ollyver on 4 November 1594 in St. Bride's Church, London, London, England.1,2,4,5 Edward Winslow died in 1620 in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England.1

Child of Edward Winslow and Eleanor Pelham

Children of Edward Winslow and Magdelene Ollyver

Citations

  1. [S92] William S. Appleton, "English Ancestry of the Winslow Family."
  2. [S21] John H. Sheppard, "Genealogy of the Winslow Family."
  3. [S310] Shannon Knapp, "My Family History", Oc. 28, 2002, unverified.
  4. [S152] New England Families, online.
  5. [S1091] Marriage Record: London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812.
  6. [S11] Mayflower History, online www.mayflowerhistory.com.
  7. [S1164] Ruth C. McGuyre and Robert S. Wakefield, MF 5 WInslow.
  8. [S1165] Robert Moody Sherman and Verle Delano Vincent, MF 15 Chilton.
Last Edited=30 Jun 2015

Eleanor Pelham1

b. circa 1564, d. 1593
     Eleanor Pelham was born circa 1564 in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England. She was the daughter of Herbert Pelham and Catherine Thatcher.2 Eleanor Pelham married Edward Winslow, son of Kenelm Winslow and Elizabeth Foliott, before 1585.3 Eleanor Pelham died in 1593 in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England.

Child of Eleanor Pelham and Edward Winslow

Citations

  1. [S280] David Bair, "Bair Research", Mar. 31, 2002, unverified.
  2. [S429] Vicky Ballantine, "Margaret Hicks", Apr. 23, 2003, unverified.
  3. [S152] New England Families, online.
Last Edited=9 Sep 2003

Moses Montrose Pallen1

b. 1810, d. 24 September 1876
     Moses Montrose Pallen was born in 1810 in King and Queen County, Virginia.2,3,4 He was the son of Solomon Pallen. Moses Montrose Pallen married Janet Cochran, daughter of William G. Cochran and Susanna M. McCannon, on 6 April 1835 in Baltimore County, Maryland.3,5,1 Moses Montrose Pallen died on 24 September 1876 in St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri. The cause of death was "Atony of bowels." St. Louis Death Records says 13 May 1866, but that conflicts with his being enumerated in the 1870 census and the DAR lineage records of his daughter Isabella.3,6,7,1 He was buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri.6
     He graduated from School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, in 1835.8

Moved to St. Louis from Vicksburgh, Mississippi.4 He was Professor of obstetrics and the diseases of women at the St. Louis Medical College. He was the founder and one time president of the St. Louis Academy of Science. He served as president of the St. Louis Medical Society. between 1844 and 1870.9 He and Janet Cochran appeared on the 1860 Federal census of St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri, enumerated 30 June 1860. Their children Emma, Salwin B., Edmund Gordon Edrington, James Y. and Isabelle B. were listed as living with them. His age was listed as 50, occupation as physician and birthplace as Virginia. 5 servants were also in the household.10 Moses Montrose Pallen and Janet Cochran appeared on the 1870 Federal census of 2916 Olive St., St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri, enumerated 13 June 1870. Their children Isabelle B., Salwin B. and James Y. were listed as living with them.11

Joan Noyes wrote "Moses Pallen (or his father) emigrated from Poland at the age of 13. The story is that Pallen, or Pahlen was originally a Russian name, and that they were Counts or something."

Ann Pallen wrote ""Pallen was a count, either Russian or Polish. My favorite story is that he was in on the assassination of Czar Paul and fled here for his life, changing the name. Aunt Francis told me the original spelling was Pajlen or something similar. He was in the Napoleonic Wars on the russian side. His first name was Solomon, his son was Moses, and Moses' son was Montrose who was grandfather Pallen's father."

Excerpts from a book called "Under Three Tsars" (rest of citation missing) refers to a Count Pahlen as Minister of Justice. The few pages available do not give any dates or the name of the Tsar in question.2

From The Encyclopedic History of St. Louis: "Pallen, Moses M., physician, was born in King and Queen County, Virginia, in 1810, and died in St. Louis, September 24, 1876 He was reared in the "Old Dominion" and educated at the University of Virginia, at Charlottesville, from which institution he was graduated with class honors. Subsequently he studied medicine in the Medical Department of the University of Maryland, at Baltimore, and soon after obtaining his doctor's degree he went south, settling in Vicksburg, Mississippi. There he began the practice of his profession, and continued it seven years, leaving Vicksburg in 1842 to came to St. Louis Opening an office in this city in that year, he entered upon a highly creditable professional career, and for thirty years thereafter was a successful practitioner, and also a prominent medical educator. For over twenty years, and until within three years of his death, when he resigned, he occupied the chair of obstetrics in St. Louis Medical College, and is remembered as one of the professors of that institution who had the happy faculty of instructing and entertaining, at the same time, those who listened to his lectures and pursued their studies under his preceptorship. During the Mexican War he occupied the position of contracting surgeon at the United States Arsenal at St. Louis, and a little later he was health officer of the city during the administration of Mayor Pratt, holding that position during the cholera epidemic of 1849. He was one of the founders of, and an early president of, the St. Louis Academy of Science, and for several years was president of the St. Louis Medical Society, He was a terse and ready writer, and frequently contributed articles to the medical journals and newspapers on subjects of scientific a popular interest. He was all his life a close student and patron of literary, professional other societies designed to promote culture and scientific attainments. He helped to found the University Club; sought to make it in a measure, a literary, as well as a social organization, and was a frequent participant scientific and other discussions which took place under its auspices. He married Janet Cochran, daughter of William Wallace Cochran, a prominent merchant of Baltimore who was one of the defenders of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812. He was survived by his wife, four sons and two daughters, The sons were Dr. Montrose A. Pallen, S. B. Pallen, E. G. Pallen and James Y. Pallen. His daughters became the wives respectively of Judge Irwin Z. Smith, of St. Louis, and Joseph Alger, of Washington, D. C.12

G. McArdle reports that the name Montrose came from the Duke of Montrose in Scotland who was part of the Graham Clan.13

Children of Moses Montrose Pallen and Janet Cochran

Citations

  1. [S1158] DAR Patriot Record, online http://services.dar.org
  2. [S23] "Joan Noyes' notes," Joan Noyes, c 1945 Collection of A. Gulbransen.
  3. [S74] National Society of DAR, DAR Lineage Books, Volume 87, Lineage of Isabella Pallen Smith.
  4. [S221] William Hyde and Howard L. Conrad, History of St. Louis.
  5. [S204] Maryland Marriage Index (published).
  6. [S205] St. Louis Death Records, online www.ancestry.com.
  7. [S1110] Missouri, Death Records, 1834-1910.
  8. [S202] Virginia Medical Students, online.
  9. [S210] Washington University Library, online http://medicine.wusl.edu/paint/tp2601.html
  10. [S670] 1860 United States Federal Census, MO, Roll M653_655, Book 1, pge 349.
  11. [S671] 1870 United States Federal Census, MO, Roll M593- 816, Book 1, page 323A.
  12. [S221] William Hyde and Howard L. Conrad, History of St. Louis, Volume III, pages 1690-1.
  13. [S207] Grace McArdle, "Grace McArdle's Data," e-mail to Ann Gulbransen, Jun. 29, 2001.
  14. [S101] St. Louis Marriages, online.
  15. [S670] 1860 United States Federal Census, MO, roll M653_Roll 655, Book 1, pge 349.
  16. [S74] National Society of DAR, DAR Lineage Books, Lineage of Isabelle Pallen Smith, Volume 87, page 107.
Last Edited=3 Jul 2015

Solomon Pallen

b. before 1784, d. date unknown
     Solomon Pallen was born before 1784 in Russia. His birthdate estimated from his age in the 1810 census.1 His death date has not been found.
     Solomon was also known as Pahlen. He appeared on the census of 1810 in King and Queen County, Virginia. The family included 1 male under 10, 1 male 26-44, 2 females under 10, 1 female 10-15 and 1 female 26-44.1 He appeared on the census of 1830 in Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia.2

Story from Ann D. Pallen: Solomon Pahlen was a Russian count and was involved in the assassination of Czar Paul and fled to the United States to save his life, changing his name to Pallen in the process. He was in the Napoleonic wars on the Russian side.

Child of Solomon Pallen

Citations

  1. [S665] 1810 United States Federal Census, VA, roll M252_69, book 1, p. 441.
  2. [S667] 1830 United States Federal Census, 1830; Census Place: Constantia, Oswego, New York; Series: M19; Roll: 115; Page: 212; Family History Library Film: 0017175.
Last Edited=3 Feb 2015

Rev. Moses Noyes1,2,3

b. 6 December 1643, d. 10 November 1729
     Rev. Moses Noyes was born on 6 December 1643 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.4,1,2,3 He was the son of Rev. James Noyes and Sarah Brown.1,2,3 Rev. Moses Noyes married Ruth Pickett, daughter of John Pickett and Ruth Brewster, before 1678 in New London, Connecticut Colony.2,3 Rev. Moses Noyes died on 10 November 1729 in Lyme, Connecticut Colony, at age 85.4,5,3
     He graduated from Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts Bay Colony, in 1659.4,2

Citations

  1. [S843] Early VR Essex Co. MA (published), Vital records of Newbury.
  2. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
  3. [S1152] Barbara Lambert Merrick, MF 24 Brewster.
  4. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  5. [S1005] The Ricker Compilation (published), Lyme VR.
Last Edited=9 Feb 2015

Thomas Noyes1,2

b. 10 August 1648, d. before 24 April 1730
     Thomas Noyes was born on 10 August 1648 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.3,1,2 He was the son of Rev. James Noyes and Sarah Brown.1,2 Thomas Noyes married as his first wife Martha Pierce on 28 December 1669 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.3,2 Thomas Noyes married as his second wife Elizabeth Greenleaf, daughter of Stephen Greenleaf and Elizabeth Coffin, on 24 September 1677 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.4,1,2 Thomas Noyes died before 24 April 1730.3
      Paul Noyes wrote: "Freem. 1671, and capt. 1690 in war with E. Ind. and rep. 1689, 90, and 2. Freeman 1671.
Descendants of Reverend William Noyes: Colonel of militia.

The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II: Thomas was a prominent man in early colonial days. He was made a freeman 31 May 1671; selectman, 1676-7; chosen constable 1679-80, but not wishing to serve, paid the usual fine of forty shillings. He served during the French and Indian wars in several different grades- captain, major, lieutenant-colonel, and colonel.

May 31st, 1684, Capt. Thomas Noyes of Newbury was ordered by Major Nathaniel Saltonstall of Haverhill "to provide a flight of colors for the foot company, ye ground field or flight whereof is to be green, with a red cross, with a white field in ye angle, according to the antient custome of our own English plantations in America, and our own practice in our ships and other vessels. The number of bullets to be put into the colors for distinction may be left out at present without damage in the making of them."

August 3rd, 1705, Col. Saltonstall wrote to Lt. Col. Noyes, of Newbury, as follows: - "Sir-By his excellency's express direction, I command you in her majesty's name forthwith to appoint and set forth one half of your command by name and have them ready, well fixt with arms, ammunition, and ten day's provision, to march at an hour's warning. The command is strict."

Sept. 28th, 1705, Col. Saltonstall wrote again, as follows: "I desire and order by tomorrow morning at farthest, you pess and post at your block houses at Newbury twelve able soldiers, three at each of your block houses, to abide there night and day to watch."

In June 1706, under commands from Col. Saltonstall to Col. Noyes, twenty able soldiers of the Newbury militia were sent to Haverhill, on July 5th, and when they appeared Col. Saltonstall wrote again, as follows:- "I received your return of ye twenty men ye Governor commanded me to call for, and when ye persons (which I can't call men), appeared, even a considerable number of them, to be but boys, or children, and not fit for service, blind in part, and deaf, and cross-handed, I slept till I waited on ye Governor, ye twelfth instant, and upon liberty to speak to him, I, with ye Major, have taken ye best care we can to keep the men and children sent hither for the present, till I may have opportunity to tell you the queen likes it not to be served in this manner. But in one special, Nicholas by name, is blind and deaf and small, and not fit to be continued, and therefore, to be short, I sent Nicholas home to you, and do expect you will send some able man in his place, if you have an able one in Newbury. The other diminutives are sent out to garrison at present, or else you had met with them to return to you for a like exchange.

My heart if it speaks is full. I want a suitable time to tell you what I have to say on her majesty's behalf. Twelve BOYS for originally prest MEN, and they hired too. I know not ye irregularity of it. I shall be glad to see you, and intend to do it, either at Haverhill or Newbury, or a middle place, as you may desire, if I am able to attend to see what is right and what our duty for us to do."

Two weeks later Col. Saltonstall wrote again, as follows: "One Smith came this day with two of his sons in order to get a release for John Danforth. I wonder how you concern yourself so much about this man to get Danforth home, and disregard your default, and have not yet sent a good man for that pitiful insufficient sick man Nicholas, whom I sent off ye 16th day of July last to you to send a better hand + he to return in two days time to me, but he is not yet come or other for him. Pray consider what lies at your door, and do not deal so unhandsomely with your patient friend and humble servant. N. SALTONSTALL, to LT. COL. T. NOYES"

On account of Indian hostilities, the following order was issued, August 7, 1690:- "These are in his majesty's name to require all the soldiers belonging to this towne to bring their arms and ammunition to ye meeting house every saboth day and at all other publick meetings, and also they are required to carry their arms and ammunition with them into meadows and places where they worke, and if any man doe refuse or neglect his dewty as above expressed he shal pay five shillings for every such neglect.

(Signed) DANIEL PIERCE, Captain THOMAS NOYES, Captain STEPHEN GREENLEAF, Captain JONA. MOORES, Lieutenant JACOB TOPPAN, Ensign HENRY SOMERBY

Thomas Noyes was selectman, 1683-4 and '85; tithing man in 1684; justice of the peace, 1700-01. May 6th, 1689, he was chosen one of a committee to consult with the Committee of Safety in Boston and consider with them what may be best for the conservation of the peace of the country." "Dec. 18th, 1699, Col. Danl. Pierce and Major Thomas Noyes were by vote desired and impowered to imploy ye Honrble Capt. Samuel Sewell of Boston, Esq., to procure a good and sufficient meeting hous bell for the Towne of Newbury suitable for our Towne considering ye remoteness of our dwellings." Oct. 18th, 1700, a committee was appointed to assign seats in the new meeting house to the freeholders and inhabitants of the town, and it "was voted that Coll. Danl. Pierce, Esq., should have his first choyce for a pew + Maj. Thomas Noyes, Esq., shall have the next choyce for a pew." "March 27, 1704, Coll. Thomas Noyes, Esq. (and others) were chosen to be a committee to lay out the High way to Bradford, +c." May 16, 1683, the General Court ordered that "Thomas Noyes be Captaine of the second company, *** and that commissions goe out accordingly."

His estate inventoried £4460 and two negro slaves. To his son Thomas he gave his silver-hilted sword, and to his son Stephen his brass-hilted sword.

July 23rd, 1688, Captain Thomas Noyes of Newbury bought of Daniel Pierce, Sr., in consideration of a promise his deceased father, Daniel Pierce, had made to Captain Noyes, as a portion with his daughter, viz.: 40 acres of meadow, being in or about the town of Woodbridge, in the Province of East New Jersey, or New Cesarea, bounded by or upon the meadow of Stephen Kent, Sr., on the east; by the meadow of the Lord Proprietor on the south, the upland in com. and swamp on the west, and by a parcel of upland granted by my said father on the north, which may more large appear by a patent dated September 10, 1670. *** Said Pierce also confirmed another promise that his father had made to Captain Noyes, viz.: To give him a farm of 100 acres on Slingtail Brook, in New Cecarea, or N.J.

Thomas Noyes lived in his father James' house after the death of his mother.

Title - Esq."3

Child of Thomas Noyes and Martha Pierce

Citations

  1. [S843] Early VR Essex Co. MA (published), Vital records of Newbury.
  2. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
  3. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  4. [S146] James Edward Greenleaf, Greenleaf Genealogy.
Last Edited=22 Dec 2007

John Noyes1,2

b. 4 June 1649, d. 9 November 1678
     John Noyes was born on 4 June 1649 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1,2 He was the son of Rev. James Noyes and Sarah Brown.1,2 John Noyes married Sarah Oliver, daughter of Peter Oliver before 1672.2 He died on 9 November 1678 in Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony, at age 29.1 He was buried on 10 November 1678 in Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
Last Edited=22 Dec 2007

Rebecca Noyes1,2

b. 1 April 1651, d. date unknown
     Rebecca Noyes was born on 1 April 1651 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.3,1,2 She was the daughter of Rev. James Noyes and Sarah Brown.1,2 Rebecca Noyes married John Knight, son of John Knight and Bathshua Ingersoll, on 1 January 1671/72 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.2 Her death date has not been found.

Citations

  1. [S843] Early VR Essex Co. MA (published), Vital records of Newbury.
  2. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
  3. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=22 Dec 2007

Deacon William Noyes1,2

b. 22 September 1653, d. before 10 March 1743/44
     Deacon William Noyes was born on 22 September 1653 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.3,1,2 He was the son of Rev. James Noyes and Sarah Brown.1,2 Deacon William Noyes married Sarah Cogswell in November 1685 in Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.2 He died before 10 March 1743/44 in Boston, Province of Massachusetts Bay.3
     He was one of the primary prosecutors at the Salem witch trials.

Citations

  1. [S843] Early VR Essex Co. MA (published), Vital records of Newbury.
  2. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
  3. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=22 Dec 2007

Thomas Bliss1

b. after 1612, d. 15 April 1688
     Thomas Bliss was born after 1612. He was the son of Thomas Bliss and Margaret Lawrence. Thomas Bliss married Elizabeth Birchard in 1644.1 Thomas Bliss died on 15 April 1688 in Norwich, Connecticut Colony.1,2

Child of Thomas Bliss and Elizabeth Birchard

Citations

  1. [S17] "The Florence Fox Harrop Papers," Florence Fox Collection of A. Gulbransen.
  2. [S1005] The Ricker Compilation (published), Mason Cemetery, Norwich.
  3. [S48] The Great Migration.
  4. [S189] Genealogical Memoir of the Lathrops, online.
  5. [S1005] The Ricker Compilation (published), Norwich VR.
Last Edited=5 Jul 2007

Joseph Browne

b. 1575, d. after 1610
     Joseph Browne was born in 1575 in Southampton, Hampshire, England.1,2 He married Sarah (?) before 1610. Joseph Browne died after 1610 in Southampton, Hampshire, England.2
     Joseph was also known as Brown.

Child of Joseph Browne and Sarah (?)

Citations

  1. [S88] R. Corey, "1799686.ged", Jul. 30, 2002, unverified.
  2. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  3. [S558] James Atkins Noyes, "Noyes Pedigree."
  4. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
Last Edited=22 Dec 2007

Sarah (?)1

b. 1579, d. after 1610
     Sarah (?) was born in 1579 in England. She married Joseph Browne before 1610. Sarah (?) died after 1610 in England.

Child of Sarah (?) and Joseph Browne

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S558] James Atkins Noyes, "Noyes Pedigree."
Last Edited=24 Jan 2004

Robert Parker1

b. circa 1550, d. 1591
     Robert Parker was born circa 1550 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.1 He married Mary Edyth Burge circa 1574 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.1 Robert Parker died in 1591 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England. The location may have been in the Netherlands.2

Children of Robert Parker and Mary Edyth Burge

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S88] R. Corey, "1799686.ged", Jul. 30, 2002, unverified.
Last Edited=25 Apr 2005

Agnes (?)1

b. circa 1500, d. after 1521
     Agnes (?) was born circa 1500 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 She married Nicholas Noyes, son of Robert Noyes and Joan Mondey, circa 1516 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England, probably. Agnes (?) died after 1521 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.

Children of Agnes (?) and Nicholas Noyes

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=28 Jul 2002

Robert Noyes1

b. circa 1467, d. April 1524
     Robert Noyes was born circa 1467 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of John/Robert Noyes. Robert Noyes married Joan Mondey circa 1488.1 Robert Noyes died in April 1524 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 He was buried on 4 April 1524 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1
      Paul Noyes wrote: "In 1516, Robert Noyes leased the manor of Littleton, Hampshire, from the Abbot of the Monastery of Saint Peter's of Gloucester. (C1/861/87-91) After his death, his widow made a new lease and enjoyed it nine years before her own death. The complicated suit brought by Nicholas St. John in the Court of Requests, over possession of two-ninths of this manor, resulted in the recording of depositions about four generations of Robert's family. (Court of Requests, REQ2/14/71) Robert Noyes left a will, naming his son William as his executor, but this document does not survive. (Lists and Indexes, No. 50, "List of Early Chancery Proceedings", vol.7 (London, 1926), p.186) Joan Noyes left the earliest Noyes will on record. Buried outside the door of the church of Blessed Mary of Kimpton next to wife Joan."1

Children of Robert Noyes and Joan Mondey

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=24 Apr 2005

Joan Mondey1

b. 1465, d. October 1532
     Joan Mondey was born in 1465 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 She married Robert Noyes, son of John/Robert Noyes, circa 1488.1 Joan Mondey died in October 1532 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 She was buried on 15 October 1532 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.
      Paul Noyes wrote: "Joan Noyes left the earliest Noyes will on record, abstracted below from the Latin original probated in the Consistory Court of Winchester "Joan Noyes of Littleton in the parish of Kimpton, Winton diocese, written 15 October 1532, to be buried outside the door of the church of Blessed Mary of Kimpton next to husband Robert Noyes, to the mother church of Winchester, 12d, to the light of the Holy Cross in the church of Kimpton 2 ewes, to the daughters of Robert Noyes her son 280 sheep, to John Noyes, son of Robert Noyes, 100 sheep and a vessel called a mazer with two silver spoons, to Cecily, daughter of the same Robert, 1 silver spoon; to John Noyes the second best bed with appurtenances, to every daughter of Robert her son, a cow, to John Noyes, their brother, another cow and 6 horses, to every godson and goddaughter 4d; to Anne Noyes, daughter of the said Robert, her best prayer book, to Joan Noyes, Anne's sister, the second best prayer boo/cs and the second best silver girdle; to the said Anne her best silver girdle, to the church of Fyfield 3 ewes, to the church of Cholderton a quarter of corn, I affirm I have surrendered to the Abbott of St Peter's Gloucester title to the farm of the manor of Lytleton held by indenture from the Abbott and Convent by myself and Robert Noyes, William, John, Nicholas Noyes my sons, and Thomas Noys, kinsman, with the intention that the said William, John and Nicholas, my sons, be altogether freed, and thereupon I took from the Abbott and Convent to myself Robert, my son, Emma his wife and other of their sons and daughters, new leases which I confirm; to Sir Henry Brassart, rector of Fyfleld 12d, to Sir John Arthur, vicar of Hows borne Priors 6s 8d, to the curate of Kimpton at the time of my death 12d, supervisors to be William Mondey her brother, and Robert Bosell, and to each of them 6s 8d, residue to Robert Noyes, executor Witnesses, Sir John Arthur, Sir Arthur Nicholasson, curate of Kimpton, Sir Bernard Darbey, chaplin, William Walter, notary public of London Diocese."1"

Children of Joan Mondey and Robert Noyes

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=24 Apr 2005

John/Robert Noyes1

b. circa 1434, d. between 1484 and 1497
     John/Robert Noyes was born circa 1434 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England. He died between 1484 and 1497 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.
      Paul Noyes wrote that the progenitor of this family was "either John who farmed the manor of Ramridge 1475-84 or Robert 1493-97. It is not certain which of these two men was the father of these children, but an analysis of the evidence indicates that they were siblings.

The surname NOYES is rare. It may have originated in East Anglia at a very early period. Land held by Walter Noyse was mentioned in a fine concerning land in 'Scroteby', Norfolk, on 10 May 1209. William and Simon Noysse were both listed in the Ville of Laxfield, in Hoxne Hundred, Suffolk, in 1327. There were six Noyse wills proved in the Court of Archdeacon of Suffolk before 1600: Robert Noyse, of Fressingfield, 1463; Agnes his widow, of Fressingfield, 1464; William, of Ubbeston, 1469; Robert, of Wingfield, 1471; William, of Laxfield, 1510; and Robert, of Laxfield, 1510.

The adjoining parishes of Laxfield, Fressingfield, Wingfield, and Ubbeston lie in the north-central part of the county. The chief landholder in the region then was the de la Pole family, first Earls, then Dukes of Suffolk. The land came into their family through the marriage of Katherine, heiress of Sir John de Wingfield, to Michael de la Pole, first Earl of Suffolk. The manor of Ramridge, Hampshire, had also been acquired through the Wingfield marriage. For this reason it is possible that the Duke sent one of his Suffolk men to oversee the distant Hampshire manor, founding the Noyes family in that county. Ramridge was important as one of the greatest fairs in England was held partly on its lands.

Ramridge was held by the first Earl of Suffolk at his death in 1391. The Wingfield estates passed to his eldest son, Michael, who succeeded as Second Earl (d. Sept. 1415), but, importantly, Ramridge was settled on the male heirs of his younger brother, Sir Thomas de la Pole. On Thomas's death (21 Aug. 1420), it passed to his son Thomas, who died seised of 'Ramrugge' on 27 July 1430. Because he died without male issue, Ramridge passed to his cousin, William de la Pole (son of the Second Earl), who was created first Duke of Suffolk. Thus Ramridge was reunited with the Wingate estates in 1430. The first of the Noyes family in Hampshire may have arrived as servants of the first Duke of Suffolk at his manor of Ramridge about 1430-32. The court rolls of the manor of Ramridge record that Robert Noys was farming the manor (rendering its accounts) in 1432-33.

The Duke and his wife, Alice Chaucer, granddaughter and heir of the poet, were granted license to found God's House, better known as Ewelme Hospital, in 1437, but it was not endowed with the manor of Ramridge until 1442. It was during this short period between 1430 and 1442 that a Noyse/Noyes from Laxfield or Wingate, Suffolk, might have ended up on the distant manor of Ramridge, as the Hospital would have had no Suffolk interests by which to draw a Noyes from that county to Hampshire.

The Noyes family continued as farmers of the manor of Ramridge for at least two more centuries. The court rolls are intermittent, so the line of descent in the earliest generations in Hampshire is not clear. Robert Noys is recorded as rendering accounts for the manor of Ramridge in 1432-33. John Noyse was the farmer of Ramrugge on 26 November 1476, 28 November 1477, 1478, 1482/3, and 1484. He likely died in the next few years, as Robert Noyes was farmer of Ramrugge in 1493 and 1497. The abstract under date 21 May 1 Henry VIII [1509] states, "To this court came Thomas Noyse and took of the lord a cottage called the Saynte with lands and one acre of meadow ... to hold to the said Thomas and Agnes his wife and the longer liver of them - to pay heriot on death. And give as fine 20s. Same paid 19 Henry VIII (1503/4) [sic]." The entry for 27 September 4 Henry VIII [1512] reads, "presented that Thomas No an unknown date se farmer of this lordship and his predecessors, time out of mind, had amongst other things a parcel of land called the "Stallys" and "Bothis" lying on the King's way leading E+W as appears by metes and bounds." On 16 September 9 Henry VIII [1517] the Master of Ewelme granted Thomas Noyse the lease of the capital messuage of his manor of Ramrugge with the lands thereto belonging, courts, etc., excepting the advowson of Wee [Weyhill] Church, for a period of 50 years at a rent of £8 6s 8d. Another lease, dated 21 June 10 Henry VIII [1518] granted the same, at the same rate, for a period of 40 years. Thomas Noyse was farmer of the manor on 6 October 20 Henry VIII [1528] when he made agreements with his tenants This last Thomas Noyes is certainly Thomas Noyes (b. say 1488), from whom descent can be traced with certainty.

There are two likely scenarios by which Ramridge might have descended through the earliest generations of the Hampshire Noyes family. The first scenario assumes a direct descent through [1] Robert (b. say 1390), [II] John (b. say 1415), [III] Robert (b. say 1440), [IV] Thomas of Andover (b. say 1465), to [V] Thomas (b. say 1488).

The second scenario takes into account the possibility that the Robert who farmed Ramridge from 1493 to 1497 might have been Thomas's uncle Robert, who later acquired the lease of the manor of Littleton, and may have held Ramridge during the minority of his nephew Thomas as guardian. The earliest [I] Robert (b. say 1390) who farmed Ramridge in 1432-33 would again be the first generation, then the second generation would be unknown. [III] John (b. say 1440) who farmed Ramridge from 1475 to 1484 would be next, and father of both [IV] Thomas (b. say 1465) mentioned in the court rolls of Andover 1490-1491, and Robert, of Kimpton, who farmed Ramridge from 1493 to 1497 during the minority of his nephew, [V] Thomas Noyes (b. say 1488).

But as only names and dates have been gleaned from the manorial records, no specific relationships are known with certainty until we reach Thomas Noyes (b. say 1488). It is impossible at this point to determine which descent is correct."1

Children of John/Robert Noyes

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=24 Apr 2005

Anthony Snow1,2

b. circa 1600, d. August 1692
     Anthony Snow was born circa 1600 in England.2 He was the son of Nicholas Snow and Elizabeth Rowlles. Anthony Snow married Abigail Warren, daughter of Richard Warren and Elizabeth Walker, on 8 November 1639 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, now Plymouth County, Massachusetts.1,3,4,5,2 Anthony Snow died in August 1692 in Marshfield, Province of Massachusetts Bay.1,6,7,2

Children of Anthony Snow and Abigail Warren

Citations

  1. [S36] M. L. T. Alden, "Snow Genealogy."
  2. [S1166] Robert S. Wakefield, MF 18 Warren, Volume 1.
  3. [S48] The Great Migration.
  4. [S528] Mrs. Washington A. Roebling, "Richard Warren of the Mayflower, and some of his Descendents."
  5. [S659] Early VR Plymouth CO MA (published), Vital Records of Plymouth.
  6. [S54] Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony, Its History and People 1620-1691.
  7. [S659] Early VR Plymouth CO MA (published), Vital Records of Marshfield.
Last Edited=3 Jul 2015

Nicholas Snow1

b. circa 1578, d. after 1600
     Nicholas Snow was born circa 1578 in St. Dunstans, Stepney, London, England.1 He was the son of Nicholas Snow and Katherina Harwoode. Nicholas Snow married Elizabeth Rowlles on 9 May 1599 in St. Dunstans, Stepney, London, England.1 Nicholas Snow died after 1600 in England.1

Children of Nicholas Snow and Elizabeth Rowlles

Citations

  1. [S36] M. L. T. Alden, "Snow Genealogy."
Last Edited=27 Jul 2002

Elizabeth Rowlles1

b. circa 1580, d. 1644
     Elizabeth Rowlles was born circa 1580 in Stepney, London, England.1 She married Nicholas Snow, son of Nicholas Snow and Katherina Harwoode, on 9 May 1599 in St. Dunstans, Stepney, London, England.1 Elizabeth Rowlles died in 1644.1

Children of Elizabeth Rowlles and Nicholas Snow

Citations

  1. [S36] M. L. T. Alden, "Snow Genealogy."
Last Edited=27 Jul 2002

Nicholas Snow1

b. circa 1530, d. after 1578
     Nicholas Snow was born circa 1530 in England.1 He married Katherina Harwoode on 10 May 1559 in London, England.1 Nicholas Snow died after 1578 in England.1

Child of Nicholas Snow and Katherina Harwoode

Citations

  1. [S36] M. L. T. Alden, "Snow Genealogy."
Last Edited=27 Jul 2002

Katherina Harwoode1

b. circa 1535, d. after 1578
     Katherina Harwoode was born circa 1535.1 She married Nicholas Snow on 10 May 1559 in London, England.1 Katherina Harwoode died after 1578.1

Child of Katherina Harwoode and Nicholas Snow

Citations

  1. [S36] M. L. T. Alden, "Snow Genealogy."
Last Edited=27 Jul 2002

Thomas Noyes1

b. circa 1465, d. date unknown
     Thomas Noyes was born circa 1465 in Weyhill, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of John/Robert Noyes. His death date has not been found. He died in England.
      Paul Noyes wrote: "NEHGR Vol 149: Appeared in the court rolls of Andover 24 August 1490, 20 September 1490 and 11 July 1491. Thomas is the earliest recorded Noyes to be found in the vicinity of Kimpton, which is about four miles northeast of Cholderton.
NEHGR Vol 152: May have been born about 1465. He died probably fairly young, leaving one male heir, but it is difficult to know which references relate to him and which to his son and heir Thomas. It is likely that he was the Thomas Noyes who is stated to be "mentioned in the court rolls of Andover" on 24 August and 20 September 1490 and 11 July 1491. He may also be the Thomas Noyes who, with his wife Agnes, held the cottage called "the Saynte" with lands and one acre of meadow for the term of their lives on 21 May Henry VIII [1509]. It is almost certain that Thomas was dead by 1515, as it is clear the Thomas mentioned in the entail of Littleton about 1515 was son Thomas. Assuming Thomas was an adult by 1515, he would possibly also be the Thomas Noyes who was "farmer of this lordship [Ramridge]" in 1512. This being the case, the son Thomas was born probably about 1488, or shortly thereafter."1

Child of Thomas Noyes

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=22 Nov 2006